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Dining Table Woodworking Plan

Dining Table Woodworking Plan

This dining suite looks like it h s come right out of a Von Gogh pointing. Simple shapes and chunky proportions typify this rustic style. It is made entirely from knotty pine (the kind you can buy in your local DIY store in ready-prepared sections), but you could use knot-free pine. If you prefer hardwood, you will probably need to slim down the sections throughout to reduce their weight. The tapering shapes are easy to make, but the shoved bock slats and whittled “acorns” are a little more challenging.

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Dining Table Woodworking Plan

MATERIALS AND TOOLS:

• Table saw, planer, and thicknesser (or buy prepared wood)
• Sliding compound mitre saw
• Bandsaw
• Smoothing plane
• Spokeshave
• Mortiser, 15 mm (10/16 in) and 10 mm (3/8 in) mortise chisels
• Chisel
• Rubber mallet
• Crosshead screwdrivers
• Cordless driver, screwdriver bit, and twist bits to suit screws
• Orbital sander, 80-grit, and 600-grit sandpaper
• Pencil, ruler, tape measure, and try square
• Four sash clamps
• Forstner drill bit: 25 mm (1 in)
• Sharp knife for whittling
• Wood: see drawing – pine and pine dowelling
• Screws No. 8 cross-headed, zinc­ plated, countersink 16 x 25 mm (1 in); 8 x 38 mm (1.5 in)
• Expansion plates 12, with 15 mm (10/16 in) screws
• PVA glue, water, and cloth
• Varnish
• Brushes

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WOODWORKING PLAN FOR DINING CHAIRSCLICK HERE

STEPS :

1. Cutting the mortises

Mark out the positions of the mortises on the tops of the legs. Cut these out by hand using a drill bit, chisel, and mallet, or use a mortiser. If you are using a mortiser, you may achieve a better result if you leave the legs over-length and cut the mortise including the area for the haunch, before cutting it to the finished length. Clean out the mortise corners with the chisel.

2. Cutting the tenons

Cut tenons on the ends of the rails to correspond with the mortises in the legs. Mitre the ends of the tenons on the compound mitre saw. When the rails are fitted into the legs, the mitred ends of the tenons must not touch, as this may prevent the shoulders of the joints from closing up properly. Shove off excess wood to achieve a good fit.

3. Tapering the legs

Mark the tapered shape on the sides of the legs. Double-check that you are tapering the insides of the legs (sawing material away from the same side as the tenon is cut). Cutaway the bulk of the waste with the bandsaw and use the smoothing plane to flatten and smooth the surfaces.

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4. Assembling the frame

Check that each joint fits correctly and make adjustments as necessary; use a chisel to shave away excess wood. Set the clamps to the correct length and prepare waste blocks for protecting the work. It is best to clamp in two stages: firstly, glue the legs to the short rails and wait for the glue to dry, and secondly, join these two frames with the long rails as shown above.

5. Making the tabletop

Cut lengths of wood for making the tabletop. Leave them about 25 mm (1 in) longer than needed so that out can cut the top to the finished length once the glue has dried. Set the clamps to the correct length and arrange the lengths of wood so that the curves at the end grain alternate: upward and downward. When dry, cut to size, sand, and fit to the frame. Finish The table with varnish.

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WOODWORKING PLAN FOR DINING CHAIRSCLICK HERE

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